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Danielle
02-23-2008, 01:02 AM
I walked out of my air conditioned house this morning and was hit by the full force of Queensland Summer weather! It must have been pushin 40 degrees celcius! It was so hot and still that I could barely breathe. I looked outside at Abbi and Scrappy and they were both laying on the concrete trying to get some shade and panting severely.

I had no idea it was so hot outside, this is a freakishly hot day. So I brought them into our patio area and gave them a drink of cool water (their water outside was scorchingly hot). I called my husband who was at work and asked him if I should throw them in the pool (we have water restrictions, so I couldnt hose them), he thought it was a tad strange but said to do it.

So I took them over to the pool and threw them both in (they werent impressed!) but you wouldnt believe the difference in them, they climbed out and shook and then started wagging their tails and running around! Wowee! I was really worried that they had bad heat stroke, but the pool seemed to revive them. After lunch today when the worst of the sun is gone, we are all gonna go and jump in too!

So to all the ppl in Northside Brisbane today, please keep an eye on your dogs, it is a scorcher today and this is the weather that dogs die in.

Jr_K9_Expert
02-23-2008, 04:35 AM
I walked out of my air conditioned house this morning and was hit by the full force of Queensland Summer weather! It must have been pushin 40 degrees celcius! It was so hot and still that I could barely breathe. I looked outside at Abbi and Scrappy and they were both laying on the concrete trying to get some shade and panting severely.

I had no idea it was so hot outside, this is a freakishly hot day. So I brought them into our patio area and gave them a drink of cool water (their water outside was scorchingly hot). I called my husband who was at work and asked him if I should throw them in the pool (we have water restrictions, so I couldnt hose them), he thought it was a tad strange but said to do it.

So I took them over to the pool and threw them both in (they werent impressed!) but you wouldnt believe the difference in them, they climbed out and shook and then started wagging their tails and running around! Wowee! I was really worried that they had bad heat stroke, but the pool seemed to revive them. After lunch today when the worst of the sun is gone, we are all gonna go and jump in too!

So to all the ppl in Northside Brisbane today, please keep an eye on your dogs, it is a scorcher today and this is the weather that dogs die in.

Wow, its nice to hear that "somewhere" its hot. Here in the USA we have to worry that our dogs dont get their tongues stuck on their water bowl from it being frozen.LOL.JK. Here in Southern California its actually nice, 50F degree weather, I'm actually more worried about Junior tracking in mud from the puddles the rain left.lol.

But seriously, your right, hot weather is really dangerous, and its worst for dogs than humans because their bodily temperature is higher and plus they have coats. In addition to what you said, lets remember never to leave dogs in cars no matter if its "slighly hot", I was watching the news and they actually had someone inside the car w/ the camera person, and they had a thermometer, its AMAZING how fast that thing rises!(it was to show ppl how dangerous it is)

Also humid/hot area dog owners REALLY have to be careful because having moisture in the air impeed water from evaporating efficiently from the dog's tongue, so they have a harder time cooling down. You know how you get all sticky from being in humid weather? Thats because your body is prespiring but the water/sweat is going no where because there is already enough water in the air.

2dogscrzy4ball
02-23-2008, 02:16 PM
I'm glad everyone's ok. Last summer we were having one of those miserably hot days. Next door to my grooming business there's a dentist office. When I take my girls outback to potty I can see her parking lot. There was a van parked in the shade w/a little hyper poodle in it but still it was afternoon and VERY hot. I thought, well they're going to be in there just a minute and didn't think much of it. About 20 min. later I had to take out a customer's dog and there was the little poodle looking like it was about to pass out. I called over there and told the receptionist. I saw a girl about my age go get the dog out and walk over to my shop. Man was she mad, she started ripping my a_ _. She said that the dog had a tub of water in the van/her. I gave it right back and told HER to go sit in the van w/ the window cracked about an inch w/ a tub of water and see how comfortable she is. I was going to offer her a crate to put the little dog in while she's having dental work done but after the a_ _ ripping her mother came over and sat w/ the dog in the van while the air condiontioning ran. Hey Danielle, people leave their children in the car and outside by themselves in major heat spells so why would they care about their dogs? Those people need to be put in the same situation!:(

denmother
04-29-2008, 03:43 AM
danielle,
i know this is a couple of months late but it might be useful for next time. i saw on an rspca show that when its a matter of animal welfare the water restrictions dont apply, so you could have put the hose on your dogs. also, be careful with cold water. if the animal is severely heatstressed cold water can put them into shock. so if thats the case water that is a little bit warmer would be better.

jacko
04-29-2008, 05:58 AM
nice.... you should take some picture nxt time... ;)

Shells_k
04-29-2008, 02:19 PM
HaHa yeah Dani you should have taken some pics!! Glad the pooches were okay. As Jr_K9_Expert said we are still dealing with crappy weather out here (Im in suburb of Chicago). It actually snowed here yesterday.... *(*&$%$#^*(&*()(!!! LOL

2Dogs, you go girl, I would have given it right back to that girl as well. How terrible is that, and with hot as it is the dog would have been drinking HOT water to boot. I just dont understand some people.

Jr_K9_Expert
04-29-2008, 07:31 PM
HaHa yeah Dani you should have taken some pics!! Glad the pooches were okay. As Jr_K9_Expert said we are still dealing with crappy weather out here (Im in suburb of Chicago). It actually snowed here yesterday.... *(*&$%$#^*(&*()(!!! LOL

2Dogs, you go girl, I would have given it right back to that girl as well. How terrible is that, and with hot as it is the dog would have been drinking HOT water to boot. I just dont understand some people.

Well it was freezing a couple months ago now its really hot!!! Yesterday we reached the mid 90's, and thats just at the end of April, can't wait for summer:rolleyes: :(

LabMomHouston
04-29-2008, 09:30 PM
I cannot believe people still think its ok to leave dogs inside a car!!! How insane! Thank you, thank you for calling over there and saving that poor guy.

I've always lived in the hottest climates it seems. So I've always learned that you can't leave pets in a car and you need to really keep an eye on them in the summer. It's techinically not summer here in Texas, but it sure feels like it. When my guys go out to do their business...I make sure they're back in within a short time. There's plenty of shade in the yard and on the patio but that doesn't help much when the temps climb and they're acclimated to 73 degrees in the house. :)

Ice cubes are their best friends in the summer. They love eating ice. They also LOVE frosty paws which are a great treat in the summer time.

6dogmom
04-29-2008, 10:07 PM
Hot here today too. Not to hot though, not yet any way. Pups go outside with the big guys now. I have to make sure I have a little bowl of water out there. The other one is to big, they could probably swim in it. New pictures on the way soon.
I hope to buy my guys a pool soon. A big plastic cow trough. 300.00 dollars, I want to dig a whole and make it almost ground level so max can get in it. Then I really will have muddy dogs all the time. oh well

Jr_K9_Expert
04-29-2008, 11:03 PM
Ice cubes are their best friends in the summer. They love eating ice. They also LOVE frosty paws which are a great treat in the summer time.

My friend was telling me that it hit 112 F on saturday here! I didn't really bother to check but I can remember it was hot. I wish I could get dogster or frosty paws but they don't seem to sell it here!!! I've looked everywhere, guess Jr will have to settle for regular Ice Cream.lol.

2dogscrzy4ball
04-30-2008, 12:18 AM
My friend was telling me that it hit 112 F on saturday here! I didn't really bother to check but I can remember it was hot. I wish I could get dogster or frosty paws but they don't seem to sell it here!!! I've looked everywhere, guess Jr will have to settle for regular Ice Cream.lol.
I've seen the frosty paws in the human ice cream section! Almost bought some for me until I read the label!

Danielle
04-30-2008, 12:43 AM
Oh look, can you all cut it out! Its getting into winter here and Im freezing my butt off! :(

Dont wanna hear about you lucky folk in nice warm weather eating ice creams! Grrrr!:mad:

So go on! Enjoy your lovely summer while I sit here and freeze!:p

LOL!

Brooke
04-30-2008, 01:01 AM
Yeah, stupid winter :eek:

LabMomHouston
04-30-2008, 01:03 AM
My friend was telling me that it hit 112 F on saturday here! I didn't really bother to check but I can remember it was hot. I wish I could get dogster or frosty paws but they don't seem to sell it here!!! I've looked everywhere, guess Jr will have to settle for regular Ice Cream.lol.

No frosty paws?!?!?! I'm sure JR doesn't mind the human variety either. My friend actually made her own frosty paws. I don't have the patience for that. :) But I think you find a recipe online if you really want to make some.

I had a dog when I was a kid that ate nothing but the Strawberry Shortcake popcicle type we got from the ice cream truck that drove up and down the streets. He would hear the truck with its little tune playing and run out there to meet the truck with us! It was the most hilarious thing.

2dogscrzy4ball
05-05-2008, 11:52 PM
Oh look, can you all cut it out! Its getting into winter here and Im freezing my butt off! :(

Dont wanna hear about you lucky folk in nice warm weather eating ice creams! Grrrr!:mad:

So go on! Enjoy your lovely summer while I sit here and freeze!:p

LOL!
What a whiner! Brooke too! If my memory serves me correct you two were bragging about swimming and going to the....oh whatever it's called... to walk on the beach while all of us were freezing our A$$es off!! How long do your winter's last? Does it get cold cold or just cold?

Jr_K9_Expert
05-06-2008, 12:01 AM
No frosty paws?!?!?! I'm sure JR doesn't mind the human variety either. My friend actually made her own frosty paws. I don't have the patience for that. :) But I think you find a recipe online if you really want to make some.

I had a dog when I was a kid that ate nothing but the Strawberry Shortcake popcicle type we got from the ice cream truck that drove up and down the streets. He would hear the truck with its little tune playing and run out there to meet the truck with us! It was the most hilarious thing.

Yup, I've looked all over the place and I can't seem to find frosty paws! But your right, Junior definitely doesn't mind the human icecream, as a matter whenever he gets a little bit he goes crazy and wants more. It doesn't have to be hot, he just loves it.lol

LabMomHouston
05-06-2008, 12:33 AM
LOL! Junior sounds alot like me actually. :)

Danielle
05-06-2008, 01:39 AM
What a whiner! Brooke too! If my memory serves me correct you two were bragging about swimming and going to the....oh whatever it's called... to walk on the beach while all of us were freezing our A$$es off!! How long do your winter's last? Does it get cold cold or just cold?

Hey! Grrrrrr.....!

But yeah, I spose I am being a whiner! LOL!

It doesnt really get that cold here, not compared to the states or europe. But when you are used to 40 degrees celcius summers, you really feel the cold!

Danni.

Jr_K9_Expert
05-06-2008, 01:40 AM
LOL! Junior sounds alot like me actually. :)

I guess that makes three of us! I love to eat icecream at anytime, and as long as its not chocolate, Junior gets a little.

Oh and I think I've been told the recipe for the homemade dog icecream, i'll need to look for it.

You want to know something strange, whenever I mention Icecream for dogs to someone that I know, they look at me like I'm crazy! Isn't that strange?:o :confused:

Brooke
05-06-2008, 01:46 AM
I just hate winter, because I am a beach bunny!! I LOVE the beach, and hate that I can't go in winter :( I always miss it!

k9mania
05-20-2008, 11:13 PM
For many people it is that time of the year. This last weekend it was over 100 every day here in Northern CA. I went to 2 agility tournaments and had a dog lesson. I heard the agility people say it is only 30 some seconds while they tried to run as little as possible by directing their dog from a distance. We must all be very careful during the summers. Sorry Brooke that yours is over:)


UNATTENDED PETS
Leaving a pet alone in a vehicle has a number of potential risks. Always be conscious of the effects of heat buildup in a vehicle because it only takes a few minutes for the internal heat to increase forty degrees above the outside air temperature... especially in direct sunlight. Even a dog’s body heat (expired air in the dog’s breath is 102 degrees and has 100% humidity!) will act like a heater inside an enclosed space. Leaving windows open slightly at the top surely helps IF there is a breeze. However, that opening also invites children to poke their fingers in or unkind folks to tease the dog with sticks. Pets left in cars are at a severe disadvantage when it comes to being able to dissipate heat from their bodies. Even in the shade, and especially in humid conditions, dogs need to inhale air cooler than their normal body temperature of 102 degrees. In fact, even 80 degree air temperatures can be dangerous. Heat stroke is a dire emergency and one from which many pets do not recover. And you'd be shocked to find out just how fast it can occur. If you ever find your pet distressed from overheating in a vehicle, get to the nearest animal hospital immediately... don't even call first; just GO!
WHAT IS HEAT STROKE
Living cells have temperature tolerance limits. Go beyond those limits and the cell breaks down, looses functional capacity, releases chemicals within itself that cause more adverse reactions, and eventually ceases to function and dies. Tolerance to higher than optimum temperatures for mammals breaks down at about 107 degrees. And the death of the cell (that state where the traumatized cell cannot recover from the heat injury) occurs when time and temperature factors combine to terminate the cell's integrity. The longer the cell is above the 107 http://www.thepetcenter.com/gen/hs_6.jpgdegree level the less chance there is for the cell to recover. The higher the temperature becomes above 107 degrees the faster the cell death occurs. In pets confined to a space where the ambient (surrounding) temperature and humidity are above tolerable levels the animal's body will begin to acquire heat from the environment faster than it can dissipate that heat. In overheated humans we begin to sweat, which evaporates (unless the humidity is 100 percent), and cools the skin surface and assists in dissipating that heat buildup. In fur covered dogs and cats that have very few sweat glands to begin with the only means of dissipating excess body heat is via panting. This movement of air over the moist tongue and airway surfaces increases evaporative cooling (again, unless the ambient humidity is 100 percent). Unfortunately, panting is a rather inefficient means of dissipating body heat and actually generates some heat due to the muscle activity involved. Keep in mind that as an animal is confined to a closed space the expired air, which is at 100 percent humidity and 102 degrees, will eventually increase the ambient humidity and temperature of the animal's space. Plus, especially with larger animals such as Great Danes and St. Bernards, their body heat will increase the ambient temperature in the vehicle. It should be readily obvious that leaving an animal in an enclosed space, even if the vehicle is in the shade and even if the outside temperature is only in the seventies, will cause a buildup of temperature and humidity in that vehicle. Time and temperature and humidity are critical factors in the development of heat stroke in pets. And once the animal's cells reach 107 degrees it is crucial for any chance of recovery to lower that temperature as fast as possible. Otherwise death will result no matter what you do to try to save the animal.
SIGNS OF HEAT STROKE
Signs of heat stroke are intense, rapid panting, wide eyes, salivating, staggering and weakness. Advanced heat stroke victims will collapse and become unconscious. The gums will appear pale and dry. If heat stroke is suspected and you can take the animal's temperature rectally, any temperature above 106 degrees is dangerous. The longer the temperature remains at or above 106 degrees the more serious the situation. If you return to your car or the area in which the animal was confined and find your pet seems to be highly agitated, wide-eyed and panting uncontrollably... start for the nearest animal hospital right away with the air conditioning at full blast. Otherwise get the dog to a cool area and begin the treatment for heat stroke.

See the rest of the article at:

http://www.thepetcenter.com/gen/hs.html

BichonFowner
05-21-2008, 03:17 AM
I was at the local dog park a few weeks ago and a women had three dogs, a 10 month old German Shepard, and two smaller dogs. She wanted to take her GSD to the part of the park where bigger dogs go, so she put both of her smaller dogs in her mini-van. A couple of us noticed it but didn't think too much about it. It was about 4:30pm, not hot at all and she had the windows wide open. Well, the smaller of the two was on the dashboard and the other one was barking wanting his owner. Next thing you know, we saw the dog just outside the gate of the dog park. The dog had jumped out of the window! Poor thing. A lady brought the dog over to it's owner. Dogs will go great lengths to not be left alone I guess. A person told me here in Southern California, they have strict laws in which you cannot leave your dog unattended ever in your car even if you are in a distance close by to see your dog, or even if it is a quick run into a store and out. Someone can easily report you and they don't know how short or how long the dog was in the vehicle.

lovethatdogg
05-21-2008, 03:59 AM
Wow...thats alittle scary! I too get very afriand this will happen. The paths and sand get extreamly hot and my pups cannot even take it. I usually will take them out in the morning or at later evening. But if i cannot....i bring a spray bottle and water for them and their feet. The best way to cool a pup off is to put water on there chest. Until the wheather get cooler.....we are less active with walks around my area.

bulldogger_1
05-23-2008, 09:49 AM
as silly as it may sound. but putting a dog suffering from heatstroke into water mildly hot or cold is dangerous. because it itself is dangerous because putting water on a hot dog leads to heatstroke too.. as some suggested the ice water along with slightly wetting the dogs head to cool down the brain helps more than anything...

Furbilator
05-23-2008, 06:46 PM
Do not use the 'wet the head' technique to cool your animal. The cooling, in order for it to be effective, must be applied to as much surface skin as possible, the best area to start with is the hairless groin and belly. As the blood circulates through the body it travels along the surface of the skin through expanded blood vessels to cool it and will pick up on the cooling over the entire skin surface instead of just the small patch on the head. Remove them from the sun and heat source and let them lay down. Use water or cooling cloths that is slightly cooler than the dog's body temperature to start slowly adding cooler water until the dog is comfortable or beginning to recover. Don't get them too cold or they will definitely go into post recovery shock. Supply lots of cool (not cold) water to drink and stop all activity for at least an hour for the animal to recouperate.

Hope this helps.

2dogscrzy4ball
05-23-2008, 07:19 PM
I've always heard to put water on their chests first then the groin/belly. I guess it's all kinda the same in the long run huh?:)

Suz23
05-23-2008, 07:24 PM
Dont forget the feet people - dogs sweat from their feet and without getting too complicated a good way to cool a dog down effectively is to get them to stand in cool water.

Furbilator
05-23-2008, 09:45 PM
I've always heard to put water on their chests first then the groin/belly. I guess it's all kinda the same in the long run huh?:)

Yup, as long as you try and cool down the largest area of skin possible. It is just that some dogs have a lot of fur on their chests making it more difficult to cool them. That is why I always recommend to cool them on the hairless part of the body first...cools them quicker which is essential if they are getting critical.

Jr_K9_Expert
05-23-2008, 11:51 PM
Yup, as long as you try and cool down the largest area of skin possible. It is just that some dogs have a lot of fur on their chests making it more difficult to cool them. That is why I always recommend to cool them on the hairless part of the body first...cools them quicker which is essential if they are getting critical.

The hairless part? Yes I suppose thats correct, but the technically most effective way to minimize body tempreature is by placing something cool in an area where blood runs closer to the skin, like the inner part of the hind leg, and the neck. So in case of heat stroke the best thing is to get a wet towel around the neck and the inner thigh, then seeking veterinary help.

2dogscrzy4ball
05-24-2008, 04:26 AM
The hairless part? Yes I suppose thats correct, but the technically most effective way to minimize body tempreature is by placing something cool in an area where blood runs closer to the skin, like the inner part of the hind leg, and the neck. So in case of heat stroke the best thing is to get a wet towel around the neck and the inner thigh, then seeking veterinary help.
Stupid question, isn't the inner thigh the same as the groin?

Danielle
05-24-2008, 04:32 AM
Oh look! I just chuck em in the bloody pool!:eek: LOL!:D

Jr_K9_Expert
05-24-2008, 07:48 PM
Stupid question, isn't the inner thigh the same as the groin?

Correct, and it wasn't a stupid question, "a stupid question is one not asked" :D

Also forgot to mention that the armpit area is also an area where cooling may be most efficient.

Danielle
05-25-2008, 05:54 AM
Ive heard about under the armpit and the thigh. Isnt it because that is where the largest artery is and if you cool that blood then you cool the body quicker? Something like that anyways! LOL!

Now you might know the answer to this one Steven - Ive heard conflicting reports about cooling them down too quickly.

Ive heard a vet say that to cool them quickly is the best thing as if they are hot for too long it can be lethal and the quicker they are cooled the less likely they are to die.

Then I heard that if you cool them too quickly you can give them a heartattack! Ive even been told not to drink cold water on a hot day as it is not good for humans, apparently we should drink water that is room temp as it is not such a shock to the system.

Which do you believe to be true Steven and why?

Danni

Jr_K9_Expert
05-27-2008, 06:56 PM
Ive heard about under the armpit and the thigh. Isnt it because that is where the largest artery is and if you cool that blood then you cool the body quicker? Something like that anyways! LOL!

Yeah I pointed that out in an earlier post, I think.

Now you might know the answer to this one Steven - Ive heard conflicting reports about cooling them down too quickly.

Ive heard a vet say that to cool them quickly is the best thing as if they are hot for too long it can be lethal and the quicker they are cooled the less likely they are to die.

Then I heard that if you cool them too quickly you can give them a heartattack!

Yeah I wanted to point that out to you. Just remember, Dani, what happens when you place a glass cup in hot water and then immediatly in cold water? Doesn't it crack?

Alright I'm not saying that the same thing will happen to a dog but I'm saying that the consequences won't be good. See when heat stroke happens in a dog their system no longer keeps homeostasis, in other words their inner themometer isn't working correctly and when you place in cool water for too long, then the body temp falls below what it needs to be, so you end up with the opposite effect: Hypothermia. I believe that they can have a heart attack, or else go into shock, but I'm not completely sure. I'll have to research that.

Ive even been told not to drink cold water on a hot day as it is not good for humans, apparently we should drink water that is room temp as it is not such a shock to the system.

Which do you believe to be true Steven and why?

Danni

And yes, its better for you to drink water thats close to room temp (doesn't have to be exactly, besides water at that temp is nasty *for me anyway), Its just a shock for your body, that its 96.8 degrees (or more if the weather is hot) and then you poor down a glass of water thats below (lets say) 45 degrees (ice cold water). Does that make sense, and does that answer your questions?

LabMomHouston
05-27-2008, 08:18 PM
Makes perfect sense...I've seen folks almost pass out when they dumped icey water on themselves after overheating. I do believe it is the shock thing you mentioned.

Speaking of heat stroke...me and my three almost had one this weekend. :(
Our A/C died..go figure its the hottest part of the year and it decided to die. Yesterday, the dogs all played in the hose and all got baths...and today we are camping out in the bedroom with a window unit and fan. Guys start work on the A/C tomorrow thank goodness. So I am surrounded by dogs in the bedroom. They're all sleeping now. Wasn't so fun earlier when all three wanted to wrestle. LOL.

lovethatdogg
06-02-2008, 04:32 AM
Dont forget the feet people - dogs sweat from their feet and without getting too complicated a good way to cool a dog down effectively is to get them to stand in cool water.

I agree....pluse walking on hot sand and stones can ware a dog down. Some nice water...i am sure...feels very nice to their feet.