Click here to Register

K9Mania.com - Forums By Dog Lovers for Dog Lovers > Health > Holistic Treatments » Vegetarian Dogs
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 11-02-2008, 02:42 PM   #1
BichonFowner
Been Around A While
 
BichonFowner's Avatar

 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Posts: 947
Vegetarian Dogs

I was wondering if there are any Vegetarians out there that have made their dogs vegetarians? If so, is it going against their natural instinct to eat meat? I am assuming the dog is still healthy and does not lack any nutrition, right?

What is a dog feed who is vegetarian besides the obvious?
BichonFowner is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-02-2008, 04:06 PM   #2
Monsterpuppy
Been Around A While
 
Monsterpuppy's Avatar

 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: United States of America
Posts: 178
I am sort of vegetarian, but I am strongly against making dogs or cats vegetarian. They're systems aren't designed for the more complex process of extracting nutrition from plants.

If someone is set on maintaining a vegetarian household, they should have natural vegetarian pets such as rabbits, birds, ginea pigs, sugar gliders and the like.

There are commercially prepared vegetarian dog and cat foods out there, but, please, don't go that route either.
---------------------------------------------------------
Proper dog spoilage is an art form.

http://www.weaselpuppy.com
http://www.squidoo.com/dog-themed-gifts-and-awards
http://www.cafepress.com/weaselpuppy
Monsterpuppy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-02-2008, 10:42 PM   #3
BichonFowner
Been Around A While
 
BichonFowner's Avatar

 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Posts: 947
Quote:
Originally Posted by Monsterpuppy View Post
I am sort of vegetarian, but I am strongly against making dogs or cats vegetarian. They're systems aren't designed for the more complex process of extracting nutrition from plants.

If someone is set on maintaining a vegetarian household, they should have natural vegetarian pets such as rabbits, birds, ginea pigs, sugar gliders and the like.

There are commercially prepared vegetarian dog and cat foods out there, but, please, don't go that route either.
I was just wondering if it is difficult for a Vegetarian and a Vegan to feed meat and/or meat products to their pets. I know of a vegetarian that didn't feed her infant son meat which was one of the food items that was scheduled for a baby to eat along with cereal, fruits, vegetables, and table food before a year old.
BichonFowner is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-02-2008, 11:14 PM   #4
Labman
Been Around A While

 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Posts: 966
Those practicing vegetarianism are individuals and each has their own ways. I do get requests on another site foe vegetarian diest. I know vegertarian dog chows are available, and would expect a dog to do as well on one of them if it was AAFCO tested as on other AAFCO tested chows. Even the lower end of regular dog chows have very little meat in them, being mostly corn. They are still carefully formulated to provide a dog the complete and balanced diet it needs. Dogs don't seem to notice the diet lacks meat. They happily gulp it down and maintain good health.
Labman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-02-2008, 11:21 PM   #5
Monsterpuppy
Been Around A While
 
Monsterpuppy's Avatar

 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: United States of America
Posts: 178
I suspect you and I are on the opposite ends of the scale on dog feeding practices. I know that a lot of dog foods have a lot of grains and corn in them. That's one of the reasons I switched off of commercial foods altogether. I've fed my dog corn and seen it come out the other end in the exact same state it went in the front, if you get my drift. He obviously derived absolutely no nutrient value from it. It was just fiber. Granted, he'll eat it, and virtually anything you put in front of him, but seeing the vast reduction in digestive upset and rebound in good health from switching him off of commercial diets, convinced me to avoid them.

Dogs are different than people. Their digestive system is different and simpler, not adapted for massive amounts of fiber and too short to properly breakdown and utilize the nutrition in vegetables. The high content of grains and corn in commercially prepared food is blamed by some for the allergies, skin conditions, obesity, megacolon, and intussusception in dogs.

My concern with the vegetarian prepared foods is, if they don't use meat, where do they get the high protien content in the appropriate type that dogs need? The pet food recall was because chemicals used in melamine was used to artifically inflate the protein scores.

Many specialists in canine nutrition don't have an issue with high levels of grain in prepared foods. Dogs have scavaged off of people and eaten what fell from the table for a long time, so they are pretty adaptable. People have to study the evidence and reach their own conclusions. I'm kind of weird and extreme and go for the raw diet. But, I am also a vegetarian who believes it appropriate and doesn't have a problem feeding my dogs what I believe to be their nutritionally appropriate diet of dead animal. It does gross me out, though.

Last edited by Monsterpuppy : 11-02-2008 at 11:47 PM. Reason: Cat jumped on the keyboard midpost.
---------------------------------------------------------
Proper dog spoilage is an art form.

http://www.weaselpuppy.com
http://www.squidoo.com/dog-themed-gifts-and-awards
http://www.cafepress.com/weaselpuppy
Monsterpuppy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-03-2008, 06:00 PM   #6
Jr_K9_Expert
Been Around A While
 
Jr_K9_Expert's Avatar

 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: California, USA
Posts: 4,285
Send a message via AIM to Jr_K9_Expert
I'm right in between Labman and Monsterpuppy, I'm against feeding a dog a vegeterian diet, and I'm against feeding only meat to dogs. You have to balance things out, let us remember that dogs wild counterparts don't only eat meat. Biologist have noted that wolves eat certain flowers, and also the partly digested plants within the GI track of their prey. This balance is what keeps things working well. Thats why some raw diets add rice (e.g.) to the diet, plants (because they aren't the easiest to digest) keep the GI track from going through some sort of atropy.

I don't support using commercial food with high corn content, especially if its just for economic convinience, as a dog owner one should always be able to properly read the ingredient label to see past any scams to make it seem like meat is the most abundant ingredient.

If someone chooses to become a vegeterian, for whatever reason, thats great. However, its wrong to impose ones believes on our pets who are obviously not designed for such a diet.
-Steven



My dog article site - K9Domain
My dog blog - Dog Notes
Jr_K9_Expert is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-03-2008, 08:11 PM   #7
PudelGrl
Been Around A While
 
PudelGrl's Avatar

 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: Calgary, Alberta
Posts: 462
Send a message via AIM to PudelGrl
Quote:
Originally Posted by Monsterpuppy View Post
My concern with the vegetarian prepared foods is, if they don't use meat, where do they get the high protien content in the appropriate type that dogs need? The pet food recall was because chemicals used in melamine was used to artifically inflate the protein scores.
I think I might go ahead and add to this as a biologist. We don't actually know if melamine was used to increase the protein content, as it could have well been used as a fertilizer for the wheat being used. Its actually a known fact that several plants (soy, corn, wheat, rice) contain as much protein per gram as meat and other known animal derived protein sources (eggs etc...). However, we need to analyse whether or not that protein is AS useful as meat protein. To make the story short, its not. This is assumed to be because their ratio of cytosine and methamine is unbalanced (for those who don't know, these are amino acids, they are small parts of the protein chains, there are many different types of amino acids in proteins, and some are more important than others in diet. Different protein sources will have different amounts of these amino acids.). In addition, plant material needs to be heavily processed in order for the protein to be accessable.

Another thing important to mention that even though protein per g is about the same for these foods, plant based sources are much higher in calories. In a nation of canine obesity, we should be looking to decrease the number of calories in our dogs diets while keeping important nutrients there.
PudelGrl is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-03-2008, 08:26 PM   #8
Furbilator
Been Around A While
 
Furbilator's Avatar

 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: Canada
Posts: 1,675
You can rely on non-meat sourced proteins such as soybean or milk protein for example. But overall I agree with other posters that do not recommend this type of diet. Soy and milk based protein sources do not have a lot of the ingredients (iron for example) that are needed in the dog diet. Yes, you can supplement to make up the difference but there again you run the risk of having the wrong type of supplement, supplement absorbtion issues and counter reactions that could result with over/improper supplimentation.

Although it is thought that dogs are meat eaters (carnivores) they are more omnivorous than you might think. Although some human foods are not as readily digested or don't have the same nutritional value to dogs as they do to humans, dogs are more adapted to our omnivorous diet because that is how they survived.

Yes, a raw meat diet isn't harmful if the meat is handled and stored correctly, consumed and not allowed to linger to develop deadly pathogens and is part of a varied diet. Fiberous vegetation in the form of vegetables keep the intestines clean and aide in bowel movements, etc. and the carbohydrates in those same vegetables are needed for energy, brain and nerological function. Many of the dog foods now a days have added vitamins and minerals or other supplements which are debateable as to their necessity and their function.

It was only about 50years ago that we started to manufacture dog food, as most dogs were fed scrapes from the kitchen table. Although 50 years ago even us humans had a more balanced diet as compared to today.
All messages have been lab tested and approved!
Furbilator is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

K9Mania.com - Forums By Dog Lovers for Dog Lovers > Health > Holistic Treatments


Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump




All times are GMT. The time now is 09:47 AM.