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Old 04-26-2008, 07:40 PM   #1
Raven26
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Question Fear aggression question

This thread is for my husband actually but since he refuses to post it I guess I have to. We have an alaskan huskey that has a problem with fear aggression as in if you corner her when she is in trouble she will bare her teeth and growl and if you do not back down she will bite. Now she has bitten my husband once before we found this out. However now when ever he corrects her and she does this he then reasures her. She is very dominte and thinks that the order in the house is Me, Saki (the huskey), Thomas, and Bailey(border collie). Other wise she is a very sweet dog and (other than being spoiled by my husband) has no other problems. Oh and she is also about 3 1/2 years old and a rescue. I would hate to have to get rid of her so I am trying everything that I can to prevent it.
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Old 04-26-2008, 09:53 PM   #2
lovethatdogg
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fear aggression is hard to get over. but one thing you should never do is re-assure or dog when he/she is in a mad mood or arrgessive mood. Make sure you stay calm and try not to corner your dog. If you can....i would reccommend a gentle learder to work with your dog a few times a day. Walking the huskey around the house with it on is great....you have sontrol of their mouth and can pet and get him/her uses to you and your everyday life. They will understand YOU are incharge when you use a gentle learder. It is a great tool and not harmful. Good luck with what ever you do

Please... help fight BSL.
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Do the right thing and lend a hand.
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Old 04-26-2008, 11:04 PM   #3
Raven26
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thx i will try that we have got to do something. we are also going to try breaking down the kennels since we just have them out side as a place to chill. so if she wants to do that she will lose that. maybe it will help
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Old 04-28-2008, 03:40 AM   #4
lovethatdogg
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mabe..... Good luck and be careful!

Please... help fight BSL.
Not for me, but for them.
Everyone desearves a chance.
Do the right thing and lend a hand.
http://www.stopbsl.com/
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Old 06-18-2008, 03:04 AM   #5
varagon33
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Originally Posted by Raven26 View Post
This thread is for my husband actually but since he refuses to post it I guess I have to. We have an alaskan huskey that has a problem with fear aggression as in if you corner her when she is in trouble she will bare her teeth and growl and if you do not back down she will bite. Now she has bitten my husband once before we found this out. However now when ever he corrects her and she does this he then reasures her. She is very dominte and thinks that the order in the house is Me, Saki (the huskey), Thomas, and Bailey(border collie). Other wise she is a very sweet dog and (other than being spoiled by my husband) has no other problems. Oh and she is also about 3 1/2 years old and a rescue. I would hate to have to get rid of her so I am trying everything that I can to prevent it.
Fear-based aggression is a defensive reaction to a threatening situation: your dog is reacting in self-defense because he senses a threat. For example, if you back your dog into a corner while loudly telling him off about something, he'll feel boxed in and threatened, and may conclude that to prevent you from doing harm he must react with aggression.
http://dogobediencetrainingtip.com/D...agression.html
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Old 06-21-2008, 08:10 AM   #6
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What you write is contradictory.

Any dog when backed into a corner will eventually fight, you've taken away the preferable alternative of flight - really what would you expect? There is a reason why we have the saying "Pushed into a corner" Your husband's attempts at corrections are almost certainly doomed to fail. You can't "correct" the dog out of it's fear, the corrections only make things worse as you are adding stress to an already stressful situation.

I doubt that your dog is dominant and is trying to take over the house. I've yet to see a dog behave dominantly towards people. Like in most cases you've (or the previous owners) rewarded certain behavior which you now see as dominant.

I suspect something more is going on; when you write "if you corner her when she is in trouble" I have a feeling it means you corner her because she is in trouble from you and is about to be punished - if this is so then you should stop doing that!
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Old 06-23-2008, 07:43 AM   #7
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actually we have started trying a new approach and she is responding well to it we had to start using this approach due to our other dog and it works just as well with her add to that both of us are afaid to back her in a corner so that does not really happen if she is in trouble she knows it and gets a tap on the nose and that is it then we just ingore her for a while which nither of them like and every things is fine the amount of time that they get left alone depends on the severity of the crime so to speak and it gets the point across we have had to do it less and less to her and it is starting to get across to our other pet as well thanks though if anyone has any other suggestions i would really appricate it and also you guessed correctly her previous owners pretty much let her do as she pleased which is part of the reason why base housing took her from them and we had a lot of training to go though plus there was alot of other stuff going on that we did not find out about till much latter by accident. my best friend who they gave the dog to and she fostered it and gave it to us gave them a bunny thinking that they would be able to handle such a simple pet what we saw when we saw that bunny next really pissed both of us off we saw it cause they had asked her to look after it while they were on vacation and while it had been fat and healthy before it was the exact opposite then so she took the bunny away and gave it to some one who would take care of it and had a few words with them. I do think that any problems we are haveing with her stem from them just like any problems we have with our border collie stem from the and I use this term loosely "breeder" who had him for the first 6 months of his life and fair ruined him. Hes over a year old now and just now playing fetch and only with me he will not play with my husband for some reason. But like I said it is probally due to abuse. Sorry about the long blog thanks again Jennifer
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Old 08-09-2008, 09:57 PM   #8
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Originally Posted by Raven26 View Post
actually we have started trying a new approach and she is responding well to it we had to start using this approach due to our other dog and it works just as well with her add to that both of us are afaid to back her in a corner so that does not really happen if she is in trouble she knows it and gets a tap on the nose and that is it then we just ingore her for a while which nither of them like Jennifer
Hi Jennifer
i would be careful about "tapping" any dog on the nose. If she has already bitten once it is possible that she may not be that trusting of your husband now. Unfortunatley with dogs something only has to happen once for them to have a bad association. Any pysical contact in a negative manner could cause the dog to fear human hands coming towards her. Which in turn could lead her to feeling that she needs to defend herself again. Husky's generally are very stubborn and unless they are trained positively from a young age they can be hard work. Its difficult to post on forums sometimes without offending people and I really hope that you dont take any offence to this but as a suggestion instead of correcting involve your husband in more positive way. Do some fun training. Generally a dog with be "bad" if it knows that it will get attention be it good or bad. I know you haven't really elaborated as to why your dog was being cornered in the first place so it is difficult to offer constructive advise. Could you tell us what happened?
Sarah, Harry & Lou Lou
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Old 08-12-2008, 04:42 PM   #9
pennycantu
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my dogs are a completely different group and don't respond with fear agression. i can tell you what i've learned though from my training. dogs don't like to be ignored. the pack leader doesn't greet the dogs when he enters. the dogs will see you as leader if you ignore them until they are calm. i would start by doing that. if she misbehaves and needs punishmet, ignoring her for 10 min should be good enough. i would also start massaging her gums when she is calm. my trainer told me to do this to both the dogs and the cat. it is working really well on the cat who loves to bite and kick. i massage her gums and if she goes to bite, i tell her no and she stops. theoretically, it should work the same with the dogs. my dogs don't bite anymore after doing this. it tells the animal that it's okay for you to put your hands in their mouth but not okay for them to put teeth on your hands. hope that makes sense. i totally agree with corinthian though on just not backing her into a corner. that's the trigger for her to bite and that's what should be avoided. after taking my class/session from my trainer, i realize that ignoring my dogs and a firm "NO" is all they need. i have not had to use any type of physical contact as a means of correction.
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Old 08-15-2008, 01:24 AM   #10
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With a rescue the most important thing is to gain their trust. First they have been let down before. 2nd the pack must trust their leader, the leader must be fair. Working dogs need to work and get into "trouble" if there is no exersize for the mind and body. My rottie wears sadlebags, pulls a cart. These things keep my Zora happy and calm. Sled dogs left with alot of energy built up and no outlet tend to do things like dig(in couch, bed carpet) They would burrow in snow.
a working dog is a happy dog
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